At least 30 people have reportedly been killed in Sudan during days of rioting over sudden fuel price hikes.

Sudanese authorities deployed troops after at least 20 petrol stations were torched in violent protests that have raged since Monday, sparked when President Omar al-Bashir’s government announced its decision to lift fuel subsidies, immediately doubling the price of petrol.

Thousands of demonstrators turned out on the streets of the capital Khartoum. Some stores were reported to have been looted and cars set on fire. Police fired tear gas at protesters.

Schools and some universities in Khartoum have now been shut because of the ongoing violence in the streets.  

dynamicafrica

It was easier to explain Sudan’s conflicts with simple dichotomies. The North-South civil war was invariably reduced to “the Muslim North versus the Christian South.” I’m sure you’ve read this sentence before.

When commentators and writers realized that Darfuris were Muslim too, the Darfur genocide became an “Arab versus African” conflict.

But the global community knows next to nothing about the reality of Sudan

Read more in “Why we’re ignoring the revolution in Sudan“by Mohamed El Dahshan; a very insightful and analytical article on the situation in Sudan from an outsider’s point of view and why Media isn’t interested.  (via rhapsodicstanza)

Still relevant. 

anotherafrica
anotherafrica:

Image of Sudanese filmmaker, Gadalla Gubara (1920 - 2008)
He was still working at the age of eighty-eight - one of the pioneers of cinema in Africa. He lost his sight at the age of 80 years old but still continued to film life in Sudan as no one before him. Through his oeuvre, Gadalla reveals to us a Sudan both mysterious and misunderstood.
Despite censorship and lack of financial support over sixty years, he produced cinema that is independent and unique in a country where freedom of expression is a rare luxury.
The film “Conversations with Gadalla Gubara” retraces the struggle of a man who received the 2006 Award for Excellence for his career at the Africa Academy Awards, Nigeria.
The film shows a unique collection of archive footage and stills photography from one of the founding fathers of African cinema.
Gadalla was a person with a unique character: a Sudanese of great charm, caustic in his criticism of film-making, a humorist of refinement whose blindness had not tempered the rebel in him.
More about the film | http://www.gadallagubara.com/

anotherafrica:

Image of Sudanese filmmaker, Gadalla Gubara (1920 - 2008)

He was still working at the age of eighty-eight - one of the pioneers of cinema in Africa.
He lost his sight at the age of 80 years old but still continued to film life in Sudan as no one before him. Through his oeuvre, Gadalla reveals to us a Sudan both mysterious and misunderstood.

Despite censorship and lack of financial support over sixty years, he produced cinema that is independent and unique in a country where freedom of expression is a rare luxury.

The film “Conversations with Gadalla Gubara” retraces the struggle of a man who received the 2006 Award for Excellence for his career at the Africa Academy Awards, Nigeria.

The film shows a unique collection of archive footage and stills photography from one of the founding fathers of African cinema.

Gadalla was a person with a unique character: a Sudanese of great charm, caustic in his criticism of film-making, a humorist of refinement whose blindness had not tempered the rebel in him.

More about the film | http://www.gadallagubara.com/

dynamicafrica

dynamicafrica:

DOCUMENTARY: Cinema in Sudan: Conversations with Gadalla Gubara

Frédérique Cifuentes’s first documentary film, Cinema in Sudan: Conversations with Gadalla Gubara, builds up a portrait of a great Sudanese film-maker, Gadalla Gubara (1920 – 2008). He was still working at the age of eighty-eight – one of the pioneers of cinema in Africa.

(more info & tickets)

africanartagenda

africanartagenda:

Islam Kamil Ali

Profile

Country: Sudan

Style: Abstract

Medium: ink, oil on canvas, acrylic on canvas

Fun Fact: His paintings are inspired by the diverse ancient civilizations and cultures which inform his use of characters, decorations and colours. 

Quote:

" Occasionally , my painting appear to me like : narratives or dialogues between unknown population and my self , or that they emerge from a remote unknown age , or else  they are borrowed from an accumulation of a country , rich of its history , heritage and culture , or , after all  they represent (Tokens) painting in signs .". 

Paintings

1. Sudanese Pyramid

2. Ushar

3. Mosaic

4. Hina Night

5. Grandmother

6. City Sea 1

Contacts:

Islam00@hotmail.com

Islamkamil@yahoo.com

Www. Islamkamil.com

@islamKamil on twitter